<%@LANGUAGE=VBScript%> Math Matters Level 4 - Chapter 8 - Lesson 1
 
 

You and a friend are working together on a project about Dalmatians. As part of the project, you need to have 8 pictures
of a Dalmatian. You will each find some of the pictures.

You find 5 pictures and your friend finds 3. Since each of you found only a part of the 8 pictures, you each found a fraction of the pictures.

What fraction of the pictures did you find?

What fraction of the pictures did your friend find?

What is a fraction?

A fraction describes part of a whole. You can divide an item into an equal number of pieces, and each piece is a fraction of the whole.

For example, when you tear a piece of paper into two parts, each piece is a fraction of the whole piece.

You can also separate a group of items into smaller groups. For example, when you divide a box of crayons into four piles, so that each pile has the same number of crayons, each pile is a fraction.

We can write fractions with a horizontal line or with a diagonal line as shown below. The top part of the fraction is the numerator, which tells the number of parts being described. The bottom part of the fraction is the denominator, which tells the total number of parts.


Now we can describe the pictures of the Dalmatians using fractions.

You and your friend have a total of 8 pictures.

You found 5 of the 8 pictures. You write the fraction of pictures that you found like this:

You read 5/8 as "five eighths."

Your friend found 3 of the 8 pictures. You write the fraction of pictures your friend found like this:

You read 3/8 as "three eighths."

When you are writing fractions with your pencil, it is probably easier to write the fraction with a horizontal line. As we go through the lessons, you will find that it is easier to solve some fraction problems when you use the horizontal line.

When you are using the keyboard to write fractions, you will need to use the diagonal line. For example, when typing the fraction 1/2, first type the number of the numerator, 1. Next, type the slash symbol, / to represent the fraction line. Then, type the number of the denominator, 2.

 

Fractions are used when we describe parts of a whole.

 

When you divide something into two parts, you make halves. Each part is one half of the whole.

When you divide an item into three parts, you make thirds. Each part is one third of the whole.

When you divide something into four parts, you create fourths. Each part is one fourth of the whole.

Five equal parts would be fifths, and so on.

Remember, you can divide an item into any equal number of parts, and each part is a fraction of the whole.

You can also divide a group of items into smaller groups. When you and three friends divide a plate of cookies into four equal piles, you each get the same number of cookies. Each pile is one fourth.

Two of the piles could be written as the fraction 2/4.

Three of the piles could be written as the fraction 3/4.

All four of the piles could be written as the fraction 4/4. The fraction 4/4 would represent all of the cookies.

 

EXERCISES
Type your answer in the space provided.
Type a fraction to show what part of each shape is colored.
1.
  Answer:
   
2.
  Answer:
   
3.
  Answer:
   
4.
  Answer:
   
5.
  Answer:
 
6.

There are 20 students in a class. Twelve of the students are boys, and 8 of the students are girls. What fraction of the students are boys?

Answer:

7.

Susan threw 18 passes during a football game. Six of those passes were touchdowns. Type a fraction for the part that were touchdowns.

Answer:

8. Matt caught 2 of the 6 passes that were thrown to him. What is the fraction that shows the number of passes Matt caught?

Answer:

 

REVIEW
Type your answer in the space provided.
Multiply or Divide.
1. 1300 x 4 =
2. 795 ÷ 3 =
3. 1000 ÷ 2 =
4. 654 x 6 =
5. 4012 x 8 =
 
Add.
6. 54 + 123 + 325 =
7. 21 + 165 + 543 =
 
8.

How many sets of 10 are in 248?
Answer:

9.

How many sets of 10 are in 1134?
Answer:

10.

There are 24 students in your class. If you are bringing a cookie for everyone should you round off to the nearest 10?
Answer:

 

 
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